Grade 6 Curriculum Guide

Social Studies

  • Global and regional studies
  • Countries and cultures of Africa, Latin America, Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Europe
  • Native American cultures
  • The Roman Empire
  • Relationships among nations: customs, traditions and beliefs, political and economic systems
  • United Nations
  • Milestones in human achievement
  • Transportation and communication
  • World trade
  • Citizenship and social responsibility
  • World geography
  • Map and globe skills
Key Ideas and Details
  1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  2. Determine the main ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; summarize the source, basing the summary on information in the text rather than on prior knowledge or opinions.
  3. Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
Craft and Structure
  1. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
  2. Identify how a history/social studies text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
  3. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  1. Integrate graphical information (e.g., pictures, videos, maps, time lines) with other information in a print or digital text.
  2. Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a historical account.
  3. Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.
Range and Level of Text Complexity
  1. Read informational text independently, proficiently, and fluently in the grades 6–8 text complexity band; read “stretch” texts with scaffolding as needed.

Science

  • Classification of living things
  • Ecosystems
  • Ecology and the environment
  • Microbes
  • Algae and fungi
  • Human body
  • Food for growth and energy
  • Climate and weather
  • Recycling of resources
  • Elementary geology
  • Biomes
  • Oceans
  • Plants/gardening
  • Electric and magnetic interactions
  • Electricity and its uses
  • Sound, light, and heat
  • Nuclear energy and radioactivity
  • Solar and geothermal energy
  • Conservation
  • Elements and compounds
  • Universe
  • Simple astronomy
  • Space and space travel
  • Scientific theory
  • Inventions and discoveries
Key Ideas and Details
  1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of scientific and technical texts.
  2. Summarize the broad ideas and specific conclusions made in a text, basing the summary on textual information rather than on prior knowledge or opinions.
  3. Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
Craft and Structure
  1. Determine the meaning of key terms, symbols, and domain-specific vocabulary used in a text.
  2. Analyze how each major part of a text contributes to an understanding of the topic discussed in the text.
  3. Analyze the purpose of an experiment or explanation in a text, including defining the problem or question to be resolved.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  1. Integrate information provided by the words in a text with a version of that information expressed graphically (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
  2. Distinguish facts or reasoned judgments based on research findings from opinions.
  3. Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.
Range and Level of Text Complexity
  1. Read informational text independently, proficiently, and fluently in the grades 6–8 text complexity band; read “stretch” texts with scaffolding as needed.
Research to Build Knowledge
  1. Perform short, focused research projects in response to a question or problem and generate additional related questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
  2. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources using effectively tailored searches; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the evidence, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
  3. Write in response to informational sources, drawing on textual evidence to support analysis and reflection as well as to describe what they have learned.
Range of Writing
  1. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Language Arts

  • Reading silently and skimming
  • Critical reading skills
  • Introduction to mythology
  • Types of literature
  • Lyric, narrative, dramatic poetry
  • Listening skills
  • Nonverbal communication
  • Extending dictionary skills
  • Vocabulary building
  • Homonyms, synonyms, antonyms
  • Idioms
  • Using roots, prefixes, and suffixes
  • Spelling/root words/word families
  • Concepts of noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb
  • Sentence structure
  • Diagramming sentences
  • Cursive handwriting
  • Types of writing: narration, description, exposition, persuasion
  • Simple note taking
  • Writing outlines, letters, factual matter (reports, newspaper articles), verse (limericks, ballads), creative prose (diary, stories)
  • Bibliographies
  • Organization of a book
  • Using reference books and indexes
  • Using on-line information services, CD-ROM's, and other electronic reference materials
Key Ideas and Details
  1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  2. Analyze how a theme or central idea develops over the course of a text, drawing on key details.
  3. Describe how a story’s plot unfolds (in a series of episodes or as a problem to be solved) as well as how characters adapt or change as they move toward a resolution.
Text Types and Purposes
  1. Write arguments in which they:
    1. Introduce a claim about a topic or issue and organize the reasons and evidence to support the claim.
    2. Support the claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
    3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to convey the relationships among claims and reasons.
    4. Sustain an objective style and tone.
    5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument.
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they:
    1. Introduce a topic and organize information appropriate to the purpose, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect.
    2. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
    3. Use appropriate links and varied sentence structures to join and clarify ideas.
    4. Use straightforward language to create an objective style appropriate for a reader seeking information.
    5. Provide a conclusion that follows logically from the information or explanation presented.
  3. Write narratives in which they:
    1. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view, and organize a sequence of events or experiences.
    2. Develop narrative elements (e.g., setting, event sequence, characters) using relevant sensory details.
    3. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, shift from one time frame or setting to another, and/or show the relationships among events and experiences.
    4. Choose words and phrases to develop the events, experiences, and ideas precisely.
    5. Provide a satisfying conclusion that follows from the events, experiences, or ideas.
Production and Distribution of Writing
  1. Produce writing in which the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in Standards 1–3 above.)
  2. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  3. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and interact with others about writing, including linking to and citing online sources.
Research to Build Knowledge
  1. Perform short, focused research projects in response to a question and refocus the inquiry in response to further research and investigation.
  2. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility of each source, and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and documenting sources.
  3. Write in response to literary or informational sources, drawing evidence from the text to support analysis and reflection as well as to describe what they have learned.
    1. Apply grade 6 reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries, adventure stories), comparing and contrasting their approaches to similar themes and topics.”).
    2. Apply grade 6 reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment presented in a text”).
Range of Writing
  1. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Mathematics

  • Exponents
  • Operation of powers
  • Set of the integers
  • Factoring
  • Ratios
  • Statistics and probability
  • Fundamental operations with fractions, and decimals
  • Fundamental operations with compound denominate numbers
  • Multiplying and dividing common fractions and mixed numbers
  • Relationship between common and decimal fractions
  • Problems in percent
  • Properties, identification, and construction of geometric figures
  • Identification and measurement of angles
  • Concepts of similarity, congruence, and symmetry
  • Scale drawings
  • Customary and metric measurement
  • Problem analysis
  • Interpreting graphs
  • Concepts of averaging and sampling
  • Use of calculators and computers

Health

  • Personal appearance
  • Dental health
  • Health maintenance
  • Our food supply
  • Exercise and fitness
  • Cure and prevention of common diseases
  • The circulatory system
  • Disease
  • Accident prevention
  • Safety and first aid
  • The health professions
  • Understanding emotions
  • Coping with stress and anxiety
  • Preparing for puberty
  • Human reproduction
  • Substance abuse

Foreign Language — Spanish

  • Greetings
  • Numbers/Counting
  • Alphabet
  • Colors, Shapes
  • Family members
  • Animals
  • Household articles
  • Things at school
  • Sports and games
  • Food
  • Articles of clothing
  • Calendar (Days and Months)
  • Weather
  • Feelings
  • Modes of travel
  • Basic conversational phrases
  • Nouns and articles
  • Verbs
  • Pronunciation
  • Questions and responses